Shahasp and the painting in progress – January 23rd, 2017

This painting, plus some of the preparative studies, will be on display at my Open Studios exhibition March 31st – April 2nd, 2017.






Shahasp and the painting in progress – December 5th, 2016









Shahasp and the painting in progress – November 28th, 2016

Starting to work into the shapes. Taking a month long break (actually six weeks) and then taking a fresh look really makes me realize all the things not working! As I moved around the canvas with my palette knife I realized how much my view of the scene changes, even with just a few feet of movement. That constantly changing perspective is also what I love about drawing/painting from life – it’s a variety of views that no single photograph could ever capture. Working from a flat photo could never approach the movement and change in painting from life. My changing view of my subject as I move is challenging yet also refreshing! I also noticed the different light coming through the window and how it highlighted the scene in such different way to a month ago: the sun now lower in the sky as we transition from autumn to winter…
~ Jeremy



From Shahasp’s view – November 28th, 2016


Vase detail – October 17th, 2016

48″ x 48″ acrylic on canvas


Shahasp sitting for her portrait by Jeremy – October 10th, 2016

48″ x 48″ acrylic on canvas


One of my favorite parts of this process of sitting for a portrait is the evolution of it…how unexpected the portrait is. Each week I’m delightfully surprised by what unfolds. I love the depth of the texture and how much it lends itself to the character of the whole painting. I love the bright colors!
~ Shahasp


I love this process.. the voyage of discovery, of allowing the journey to flow and accepting the unexpected turns and twists along the way. I love the commitment to the journey.. an open-ended exploration and creation. I love getting to know my subject, Shahasp, better with each sitting.
~ Jeremy


The scene.. – October 10th, 2016



The painting so far… – October 10th, 2016

Underpainting – August 15th, 2016

48″ x 48″ acrylic on canvas


I knew texture was very important to me in this artwork. I decided to create my ‘ground’ with thick palette knife application of Titan Buff acrylic paint. As I applied the paint I looked at my subject and essentially painted the entire scene in impasto textural relief. I liked how it looked without any color – I could see the whole composition in the light and shadow of the texture. As an unexpected side product it was also a fabulous surface to capture for my iPad backgrounds!
~ Jeremy


Full scale compositional study – August 15th, 2016

48″ x 48″ graphite on paper


I decided on 48×48. It just felt right. My next step once I’d made that decision was to work on the compositional decisions: what scale to place Shahasp within the edges, where to place her vertically and horizontally, what symmetry/asymmtery to work with and what to have flowing off, and cut off by, the edges of the composition?
~ Jeremy


Shahasp sitting – study on canvas – August 6th, 2016

24″ x 36″ acrylic ink on canvas


The studies led into working on a 24 x 36 stretched canvas. I was inspired by the wonderful colors, shapes and patterns of Matisse’s work. I soon found, though, that I felt cramped in the space on the canvas, both with respect to overall dimensions as well as with regard to the aspect ratio. I knew I needed to work bigger!
~ Jeremy


Quick study on paper – August 1st, 2016

18″ x 24″ oil stick and pencil on paper


I started with drawing a couple of quick studies on 18 x 24 paper. This helped me get to know my subject and my composition…
~ Jeremy


Quick study on paper – August 1st, 2016

18″ x 24″ pencil on paper


This portrait sitting started with me inviting Shahasp to participate in an open-ended collaborative creative project. I wanted to work on a portrait over time. I wanted to create the space for the portrait to evolve and develop. I wanted the luxury of time in making space in our busy lives to work on this on a regular basis without a deadline, without the pressures of a commissioned artwork, without trying to please anyone, and with open expectations and a willingness to take risk. The only boundary condition I set myself was the commitment that every mark I make during this entire process will be made from direct observation while my model is sitting in front of me.
~ Jeremy

Thanks to Peggy G for helping document this project.

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